Our pick of this week’s art events: 2 – 8 October

RA Recommends

Published 2 October 2015

From the polyphonic world of Rachel Rose, to a fascinating insight into metric photography, we highlight the best of this week’s art openings, exhibitions and events.

  • Emily Jacir: Europa

    Whitechapel Gallery, London, 30 September 2015 – 3 January 2016.

    This autumn the Whitechapel Gallery presents the first UK survey of contemporary Palestinian artist Emily Jacir. Intertwining film, installation, photography, sculptural elements and performance, Jacir addresses the nature of what it is to be between spaces – physically, culturally and temporally. For the past two decades she has been exploring notions of memory, documentation, marginalisation and cultural displacement, tracing and shedding light on multiple histories in her work. Highlights include Material for a Film (2004–ongoing), for which Jacir brings together remnants from the life of Palestinian intellectual Wael Zuaiter, and ex libris (2010–12), a public project, book and installation of printed marginalia, addressing the looting, destruction and restitution of books. Immaculately curated and beautifully executed, this exhibition is contemplative and insightful.

  • Emily Jacir, Material for a film (detail) (Telegram: 18/10/1972)

    Emily Jacir, Material for a film (detail) (Telegram: 18/10/1972), 2004 - ongoing.

    Multimedia installation, 3 sound pieces, 1 video, texts, photos, archival material. Devised in part with the support of La Biennale di Venezia © Emily Jacir.

  • Kara Walker: Go to Hell or Atlanta, Whichever Comes First

    Victoria Miro Gallery, London, 1 October – 7 November 2015.

    This is the first of two shows at Victoria Miro this autumn that bring Kara Walker’s art to the UK. Walker draws on the historical layers and tensions of America’s chequered past, exploring oppression, colonialism, slavery and racial and gender relations. She investigates stereotypical visual representations of ‘low art’ – primitivism, graffiti and folk art – to reveal their distortions. Walker’s work is bold, clever and raw, marking her out as a key artist of her generation.

  • Kara Walker, The Jubilant Martyrs of Obsolescence and Ruin

    Kara Walker, The Jubilant Martyrs of Obsolescence and Ruin, 2015.

    420 x 1775 cm. Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London © Kara Walker.

  • Rachel Rose: Palisades

    Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London, 1 October – 8 November 2015.

    Now open at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery is the first solo show of critically acclaimed American artist Rachel Rose, winner of this year’s Frieze Artist Award. Rose’s work explores our collective anxiety towards impending ecological crises, and the shifting relationship between nature, technology and humanity. She has created an installation of work to respond specifically to the architecture of the gallery, a Grade II-listed former gunpowder store, built in 1805. The exposed-brick vaulted powder rooms house two of her most recent videos, A Minute Ago and Palisades in Palisades (both 2014), the projections of which are interwoven in the surrounding space with cleverly layered sound pieces and soft blue carpeted walkways. The resulting polyphonic environment is captivating and powerful.

  • Rachel Rose, Still from 'A Mintue Ago'

    Rachel Rose, Still from 'A Mintue Ago', 2014.

    HD video. 8' 43". Courtesy of the artist and Pilar Corrias Gallery.

  • Art Licks Weekend

    Various locations across East and South London, 2 – 4 October 2015.

    Now in its third year, Art Licks Weekend endeavours to celebrate the critical contribution of emerging artists and grassroots projects to London’s cultural life. Ninety artist-run projects, curatorial platforms, pop-ups and young galleries will be opening up this weekend across Bermondsey, Bethnal Green, Deptford, Elephant & Castle, Hackney, New Cross and Peckham. Art Licks Weekend offers the chance to really uncover and engage in London’s independent contemporary art scene. Highlights include:

    Chisenhale Studios, Mile End: Open Studios and group exhibition MEIL with screenings and performances, showcasing work by artists from their emerging artist programme Into the Wild, Friday 6 – 9pm, Saturday & Sunday 12 – 5pm

    Ingrid, Deptford: an artist-led project space in a domestic, intimate setting, Saturday & Sunday 12 – 6pm

    Lewisham Art House, New Cross: Open Studios and Group exhibition ‘Caesura et Vide Supra’ Saturday & Sunday 11am – 6pm. Discussion ‘Haptic Thinking and Architecture’, Saturday, 4pm

    Kiosk at Peckham Pelican, Peckham: Independent publishers fair, Saturday 12 – 7pm

    Pangaea Sculptors’ Centre, London Fields: Autumn artist residents present the exhibition Taking Shape: Sculpture on the Verge Friday, Saturday & Sunday 11 – 6 pm

    Nomad Art School, at Unit 3 Projects, Bromley-by-Bow: An open, permanent, free and itinerant art school, where artists offer their knowledge. Thursday 6 – 9pm, Saturday 12 – 4:30pm, Sunday 11 – 6pm

  • Ilona Sagar, Human Factors for Art Licks Weekend 2013

    Ilona Sagar, Human Factors for Art Licks Weekend 2013, 2013.

    Photo: George Howard © Art Licks.

  • Burden of Proof: The Construction of Visual Evidence

    The Photographers Gallery, London, 2 October 2015 – 10 January 2016.

    This fascinating new exhibition presents 11 international case studies exploring the use of photography as factual evidence in the event of crimes or acts of violence, from a drone strike in Pakistan to the Nazi concentration camps. It explores a rich and complex history of debate, contradiction and contestation in the medium’s application. The exhibition questions photography’s ability to convey objective reality and is an unusual insight into a broad range of historical and geopolitical contexts.

  • Alphonse Bertillon, Murder of Monsieur Canon, Boulevard de Clichy, 9 December 1914

    Alphonse Bertillon, Murder of Monsieur Canon, Boulevard de Clichy, 9 December 1914, 1914.

    © Archives de la Prefecture de police de Paris. Courtesy of Prefecture de police de Paris, Service de l’Identite judiciaire.

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