Mavericks: podcast round-up

Published 9 May 2016

Catch up on our recent event series on the mavericks of architecture – those who have pushed the genre’s boundaries and defied its conventions.

  • Through an installation and series of events, we took a journey through 400 years of British architectural history, taking a colourful look at twelve maverick architects who helped to shape its course: Smythson, Vanbrugh, Wyatt, Soane, Cockerell, Mackintosh, Holden, Goodhart-Rendel, Stirling, Price, FAT and Hadid.

    In these podcasts, we focus on architects who have broken the mould of British architecture in their own individual ways across its history, united only by the unpredictability of their particular kind of maverick-ness.

  • Does architecture need mavericks?

    What makes an architect a maverick? RA curator Owen Hopkins joins speakers including writer Catherine Slessor and Professor Sean Griffiths to debate the role of mavericks in architecture past and present.

  • Maverick architects – a thing of the past?

    What makes a maverick is the way they embrace risk, by working independently or refusing to conform to the norms of architectural taste or convention. In this debate about architectural education and opportunities for young architects, our panel explore if there is any future for mavericks in architecture.

  • After the age of "starchitects"

    In this podcast, our panel explores what life might be like after the signature-style, icon-obsessed, and arguably male-dominated age of the “starchitect”.

  • The artist as maverick architect

    Architecture is no longer solely the domain of architects, but of artists too. In this podcast, Sean Griffiths, co-founder of FAT, chairs a discussion exploring the different perspectives artists can bring to the making of architecture.


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