Curator’s picks: Renaissance Impressions

By Arturo Galansino

Published 3 June 2014

As the exhibition comes to an end this weekend, curator Arturo Galansino selects his favourite works in the show.

Tags

Renaissance Impressions

Curators

Exhibitions

Arturo Galansino

Curator's Picks

  • Hans Burgkmair the Elder, 'Emperor Maximilian I on horseback' (1508 and 1518), Albertina, Vienna

    Burgkmair was an artist working in Augsburg, in Germany. He is considered to be the inventor of the new technique of chiaroscuro woodcut. This print is supposed to be the first chiaroscuro print ever produced. It had a propaganda function, to spread through the empire the image of the Emperor as a warrior.

  • Hans Burgkmair the Elder, Emperor Maximilian on Horseback, 1508 and 1518.

    Chiaroscuro woodcut printed from two blocks, the tone block in greenish beige. 32.3 x 22.6 cm. Albertina, Vienna. Photo Albertina, Vienna. Organised by the Royal Academy of Arts, London and the Albertina, Vienna.

  • Hans Baldung Grien, 'Witches’ Sabbath' (1510), Albertina, Vienna

    Baldung Grien was an inventive painter and printmaker, famous for his mysterious images. This print represents a Sabbath where old and young witches are creating magic potions during a dark night.

  • Hans Baldung Grien, Witches' Sabbath, 1510.

    Chiaroscuro woodcut printed from two blocks, the tone block in greyish beige. 37 x 25.5 cm. Albertina, Vienna. Photo Albertina, Vienna. Organised by the Royal Academy of Arts, London and the Albertina, Vienna.

  • Ugo da Carpi, 'Diogenes' (c. 1527), Albertina, Vienna

    Ugo was the first Italian artist using the technique of chiaroscuro. He worked using the drawings of Raphael and Parmigianino. This print shows how the Italian chiaroscuro prints were much more pictorial compared to the first German example. Diogenes was a cynical philosopher. He is represented here with some of his attributes: the barrel where he chose to live in absolute poverty and the chicken without feathers, symbolising his criticism of the metaphysical philosophy of Plato.

  • Ugo da Carpi, after Parmigianino, Diogenes, c. 1527.

    Chiaroscuro woodcut printed from four blocks, the tone blocks in green and blue.. 47.8 x 34.3 cm. Albertina, Vienna. Photo Albertina, Vienna. Organised by the Royal Academy of Arts, London and the Albertina, Vienna..

  • Domenico Beccafumi, 'St Philip' (c. 1544-1547)

    Beccafumi was a multitasking artist working in a variety of techniques. His chiaroscuro prints are both the most beautiful and the most expressive. This print belonged to a series representing the apostles. St. Philip is depicted as an heroic old man, with a strong body and a massive presence. For expressive reasons the artist deliberately left the image in a rough state, leaving visible the grains of the wood.

  • Domenico Beccafumi, St Philip, c. 1544-47.

    Chiaroscuro woodcut printed from three blocks, the tone blocks in grey and blue. 39.6 x 20.9 cm. Albertina, Vienna. Photo: Albertina, Vienna. Organised by the Royal Academy of Arts, London and the Albertina, Vienna.

  • Hendrick Goltzius, 'Night' (c. 1589-1590)

    Goltzius was an Netherlandish artist, famous for his exuberant imagination and his spectacular compositions. The elegant body of Night is represented on a flying chariot pulled by bats. Goltzius was particularly famous for his erotic imagery and this print belongs to a series of gods and goddesses represented in sensual poses.

  • Hendrick Goltzius, Night (Nyx), c. 1589–90.

    Chiaroscuro woodcut printed from three blocks, the tone blocks in beige and green. 34.8 x 26.2 cm. Collection Georg Baselitz. Photo Albertina, Vienna. Organised by the Royal Academy of Arts, London and the Albertina, Vienna.

comments powered by Disqus