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, W. Roscoe, Liverpool, to Henry Fuseli ["My dear Friend"]

Henry Fuseli Esqr
Royal Academy
London

Le depart prochain de mon Ami M.r W.Y. Ottley
pour la France me fait un devoir de Vous adres
ser ce peu de Signes: - il se propose de

My Dear Friend,

I have so seldom of late reminded
You of my existence either in person or by
letter, that I trust you will allow me
to request a few moments of your time
to say a kind word to the bearer of this
M.r Austin, a young Artist of this place
who excels in his department of Landscape,
& who is desirous of paying his respects
to you on his intended visit to London
& of being permitted to see the various
works of art intrusted to your care
within the walls of the Royal Academy,
amongst which, I hope you will have
the goodness to favour him with a
Sight of your own. It gives me

, W. Roscoe, Liverpool, to Henry Fuseli ["My dear Friend"]

great pleasure to hear of you at times
by my Sons, & more particularly of late
by my Daughter Mary Anne, on
whose behalf our best acknowledgements
are due. I assure you it affords me
great pleasure satisfaction to find that the friendship
which has for so great a portion of
our lives subsisted between us, has been
in a manner extended to another
generation; who to an hereditary
attachment add the individual sense
of your constant kindness to them
which I am sure they are desirous
of returning to the utmost of their
power. With invariable attachment
believe me My Dear Friend
ever faithfully Yours
W.Roscoe

Liverpool 17th Dec.r 1818

W. Roscoe, Liverpool, to Henry Fuseli ["My dear Friend"]

RA Collection: Archive

Archive context

Showing item 8 of 11 in this group

Reference code

FU/2/8

Title

W. Roscoe, Liverpool, to Henry Fuseli ["My dear Friend"]

Date

17 Dec 1818

Level

Item

Extent & medium

1 piece, 2pp.

Content Description

Roscoe introduces Fuseli to the bearer of the letter: Samuel Austin, a young artist of Liverpool, who excelled in landscape, and who wished to see the various works of art, including Fuseli's own, entrusted to his care at the Royal Academy. Roscoe continues by describing the pleasure he feels at hearing of Fuseli through his sons, and particularly, his daughter, Mary Anne.

Bibliography

Weinglass, pp. 441f.