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Walter Sickert RA, The Serpentine

The Serpentine, 1925

Walter Sickert RA (1860 - 1942)

RA Collection: Art

The drawing shows a view of Kensington Gardens looking towards the Serpentine lake. Sickert had begun drawing landscapes again in 1924; Wendy Baron notes that the following year, 'Henry Rayner remembers Sickert making meticulous drawings in Kensington Gardens in June 1925 when painting The Serpentine'. Henry Hewitt Rayner (ca. 1902-1957), an Australian-born etcher, draughtsman and pupil and friend of Sickert in the mid- to late 1920s, wrote a memoir, Red-Violet (in manuscript form), which notes that he worked alongside Sickert in Kensington Gardens on 27 June 1925.

A number of related drawings and paintings exist, including The Serpentine (oil on canvas, 40.6 x 50.8 cm, Christie's, 10 June 2005), The Serpentine (oil on canvas, Victoria Art Gallery, Bath) and Study for 'The Serpentine' (pencil and wash, heightened with white on grey paper, 22.2 x 29.2 cm). The same view can be seen in Kensington Gardens (The Serpentine) (watercolour and graphite on paper, 18.5 x 18 cm, James Hyman Fine Art).

This drawing was in the collection of Carel Weight RA and is one of two works by Sickert that he bequeathed to the Royal Academy.

Object details

Title
The Serpentine
Artist/designer
Walter Sickert RA (1860 - 1942)
Date
1925
Object type
Drawing
Medium
Pencil and ink wash on laid paper
Dimensions

184 mm x 280 mm

Collection
Royal Academy of Arts
Object number
03/2279
Acquisition
Bequeathed by Carel Weight RA 1999
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